HUD – new tug Whampoa – celebrating two HK shipyards

James Chan: Whampoa is the second in a four tug series constructed by Cheoy Lee Shipyards for Hong Kong United Dockyards (HUD). The first was Taikoo  which was also named after the two shipyards Hong Kong and Whampoa Dock (founded 1863) and Taikoo Dockyard (1902) which merged to form HUD. The Whampoa is a RAmparts 3000 Class Terminal Support Tug specifically designed […]

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The Royal Naval Dockyard Hong Kong during World War Two

Elizabeth Ride:  A selection of information reported in the BAAG Intelligence Summaries.    1. Layout.  September, 1944.  [From indistinct original] The sketch plan and its key have been extracted from BAAG KWIZ Report #68 dated 29th September 1944 sent in by Elizabeth Ride. During the Battle of Hongkong, December 1941. *   At the outbreak of war, HMS Moth was […]

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Lighthouses in Hong Kong pre-1941- revised

Stephen Davies: These are the eleven lighthouses (excluding beacons and buoys) that the records show were operated by the Harbour Master before 1941. Note: The locations of Ma Wan (Kap Shui Mun) and Tungkwu/Lung Kwu Chau lighthouses are not yet shown on the map. Gap Rock lighthouse was in Chinese waters but under the aegis of, and paid for by, […]

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Unsung Kingmakers – the low-key Song Brothers who conquered the Shanghai Bund and Victoria Harbor and backed the development of several key industries in post-War Hong Kong

York Lo: Unsung Kingmakers – the low-key Song Brothers who conquered the Shanghai Bund and Victoria Harbor and backed the development of several key industries in post-War Hong Kong   V.J. Song (left) and V.K. Song in Hong Kong in the 1950s (Wendy Song)  Before the emergence of Chinese tycoons such as Li Ka-shing and Sir Y.K. Pao in the 1970s, […]

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American Marine boatyard – aftermath of Typhoon Wanda 1962

Thomas Sposato has sent a link to a website which shows photos of American Marine boatyard shortly after Typhoon Wanda made landfall in Hong Kong on 1st September 1962. Wanda was the most intense tropical cyclone on record in hong Kong and caused 434 deaths and left 72,000 people homeless.  Over 2,000 boats were either wrecked or damaged in the colony. All Photographs courtesy […]

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Taikoo Dockyard during the Occupation 1942-1945 – new information and photo

New Information in  red Extracts from reports in the BAAG Intelligence Summaries sent by Elizabeth Ride. Layout. Map reference 253545 . Map “GSGS 3868, 1/20,000 HK&New Territories” BAAG Agents´ drawings. [Can a Chinese speaker add more information about these drawings?] Craig Mitchell had this one translated and has kindly sent a copy. He writes “My friends have been up to the […]

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From No 1 on the Bund in Shanghai to a Kaolin Mine in Cha Kwo Ling, Hong Kong – the Century Old China Coast Saga of the McBains

York Lo: From No 1 on the Bund in Shanghai to Kaolin Mine in Cha Kwo Ling – the Century Old China Coast Saga of the McBains Left: The former Kaolin mine in Cha Kwo Ling; Right: The former McBain Building at No 1 on the Bund in Shanghai (now known as Asia Building) From 1903 to 1983, kaolin clay was […]

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Harry Long – employment with Kung Lee Steamship Co and HK and Yaumatei Ferry Co

HF: Harry Kin Hong Long divided his life between New Zealand and Hong Kong. In the latter he worked for two companies, Kung Lee Steam Ship Co. and HK and Yaumati Ferry Co. Harry’ s daughter, Judy Chan, has kindly sent a considerable amount of biographical detail about him. In this article I have extracted that which relates directly to […]

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From Ships in Cheung Sha Wan to Shoes in Sham Shui Po – the Chan family, Wing On Shing Shipyard and Po Shing Shoe Company

York Lo: From Ships in Cheung Sha Wan to Shoes in Sham Shui Po – the Chan family, Wing On Shing Shipyard and Po Shing Shoe Company Left: Po Shing Shoe in the Posco building at 165 Un Chau Street (Source: Flickr). Right: The original Po Shing building in 231-247 Un Chau Street in the 1950s. (Source: Facebook) The Group has […]

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