Sam Lee Shop selling quarry stone, Shaukiwan, 1840s

HF: This Antiquities and Monuments Office (AMO) Appraisal mentions that Tsang Koon-man (曾貫萬, 1808-1894), nicknamed Tsang Sam-li (曾三利) came to Hong Kong and “set up his quarry business in Shaukiwan having his shop called Sam Lee Quarry (三利石行)”. Does this mean the quarry was called Sam Lee? The shop [?] was called Sam Lee, and what did it sell? Or both? Or […]

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To Kwa Wan Quarry c1841 and 1944

HF: New information in red I am assuming, until corrected, that there was only one To Kwa Wan quarry. The quarry dates back to pre-colonial times. Patrick Hase, in his Indhhk article, Quarrying and transportation of stone in Hong Kong, 1841, says, “The most prestigious stone in Canton and the Pearl River Delta area for such quality buildings was Hong Kong granite, which […]

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Mining in Hong Kong – map showing Indhhk article locations

Here are the locations of the eight mines which we have posted articles about. Tymon Mellor found the map and Malcolm Morris inserted the mines on it. Many thanks to both. This map  can be found in Sewell RJ et al, Hong Kong Geology: A 400-million year journey, CEGG, Gov of HKSAR, 2009. Chapter 8, Economic Geology – Minerals and Mines in […]

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Ma On Shan Iron Mine – SCMP article, nearby miner’s village, three buildings restored

HF: Three buildings have been restored at the mining village close to Ma On Shan Iron Mine where miners and their families lived during the mine’s active life from 1906 to 1976 and especially during the 1950s. The Sunday Morning Post of 18th January 2015 contains an article, Ex-residents return to see village come back to life. The article says […]

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Stone breaking in Hong Kong – two further images

IDJ has sent two more images of stone breaking, or “cutting” as the second image is titled, in Hong Kong. Related Indhhk articles: Stone breaking in early 20th Century Hong Kong Film of quarry stone breaking by hand 1953 – location The Index contains several articles about quarrying and the transportation of stone in Hong Kong.

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“Lead Mine Pass” Mine – closure due to major fatal accident?

Tymon Mellor: It has never been clear why if there was a lead mine at Lead Mine pass, no one has developed the site when exploration has been undertaken all over the territory. There are references to the mine location on the contemporary maps and within Government reports following the take over of the New Territories in 1898. But no further […]

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