Sai Kung’s “Tin Man” – 81 years making tin containers

IDJ has sent this SCMP article about 99 year old Mak Sing-ying. Mr Mak has for 81 years been making pans, cans, boxes and buckets out of tin from his workshop in Sai Kung. The article was published on 9th November 2014 See: SCMP article Sai Kung’s ‘tin man’ 9th November 2014 This article was first posted on 18th December 2019.

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F Blackhead & Company, c1908 article

IDJ has sent the following article about F. Blackhead & Company written about 1908: In the early days, before the establishment of Hongkong as a British Colony, Whampoa was the farthest point to which the Chinese permitted foreign ships to proceed up the West River. Many difficulties were experienced at this port by vessels in obtaining stores, and it was […]

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Kuhn Mines Ltd, railway(s) at Ma On Shan mine – any information needed!

HF: Ma On Shan Iron Mine 1906-1976 – biggest mine in HK is one of the most read articles on the website. This is a sister piece about the company that is supposed to have supplied and/or operated an underground railway(s) at the mine. I said when I posted this article in May 2014 I could find nothing out about Kuhn […]

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Hand-dug Caisson excavation in Hong Kong – worst recent construction job? – banned 1995

IDJ: In Hong Kong until around the mid 1990s, curious observers and old men with nothing better to do were a familiar sight gathered at gaps in construction sites fences where amongst the usual activities they could observe a practise possibly unique to Hong Kong. Husband and wife teams constructing large diameter, hand dug piles, known as caissons were common […]

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Glimpses of Old Hong Kong: Sedan Chairs

Fung Chi Ming: The type of man-powered transport known in English as “sedan chair” has different regional names, including jiao (轎) in China and kago (駕籠) in Japan. In Hong Kong, where it is no longer used as a means of passenger transport, it is known in local Cantonese dialect as san-dau (山兜, “mountain cabin”), kin–yue (肩舆, “shoulder carriage”) and […]

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Traditional Tea Growing in the New Territories, RASHKB article

HF: Patrick Hase and James Hayes have kindly given permission to post their article, Traditional Tea Growing in the New Territories. KC Iu was also co-author but regrettably I have been unable to contact him. The article was published in the Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society Hong Kong Branch, Vol 24, 1984. It has three sections, each written by one […]

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Binnie & Partners, engineering consultancy, Hong Kong reservoirs and more…

HF:  In 1909 Sir AR Binnie and Son merged with another UK engineering consultancy to become Sir Alexander Binnie, Son and Deacon. Later this company became Binnie &  Partners and from the 1990s it has been part of the multi-national Black and Veatch consultancy. Binnie & Partners had a close connection to Hong Kong from 1930. The company was involved […]

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CLP’s Hok Un Power Station – immediately post World War Two

IDJ: When Hong Kong was liberated after the surrender of the Japanese, one of the first groups to arrive was “Shield Force.”  This mainly comprised 3,000 Royal Air Force personnel who had been diverted from their expected task of building Pacific island aerodromes to assist the Allied advance towards Japan. Not all RAF personnel in the war were involved in flying […]

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