Rope Making in Hong Kong – Sai Ying Pun 1970s + Kowloon 1945

Hugh Farmer: IDJ has sent the following image and extract. I added the map. New information in red. Here’s the location of Fuk Sau Lane, Sai Ying Pun.   IDJ has also sent this ” interesting clear and detailed view of rope making in a Kowloon street in August 1945.” https://www.flickr.com/photos/23057174@N02/7742172682/sizes/l/in/set-72157630976475156/ Related Indhhk articles The Hongkong Rope Manufacturing Co Ltd. […]

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The Bionomics of Pondfish Culture in the New Territories mid 1950s

IDJ + HF: This short report from the mid-1950s mentions: a) The different breeds of fish b) The levels these breeds feed at within the ponds c) The economic dynamics of photoplankton  as shown in this charming illustration  drawn by  Ip Tam Po The Bionomics of Pondfish Culture in the New Territories T Chow, Fisheries Research Unit, Dept of Zoology, […]

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Export of ‘kuan-hsiang’ 莞香 incense from Hong Kong Ts’un, Aberdeen Harbour – Ming Dynasty

HF: Fung Chi Ming has sent chapter 5 of Hong Kong and its External Communication before 1842: The History of Kong Kong prior to British arrival.  This contains a short section on The Relation between ‘Hong Kong’ and the Kuan-Hsiang’.  And this partly concerns the former village of Hong Kong T’s’un (香港村) in what is now Aberdeen harbour and which was the sole […]

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New Territories Population – 1898

Following the signing of the agreement with China on the 9th June, 1898 to extend the Colony of Hong Kong, a survey was undertaken of the “mainland and islands adjacent to Hongkong” that had been leased to Great Britain. Over the summer of 1898, Mr Stewart Lockhart, assisted by the naval authorities with H.M.S. Plover led a Commission to survey […]

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The Incense Tree in Hong Kong – a vanishing species

Hugh Farmer: For over two thousand years the Chinese have used incense in religious ceremonies, to venerate ancestors, in traditional medicine and in daily life. The two  most important ingredients in Chinese incense are agarwood and sandalwood. In what was to become colonial Hong Kong local producers brought in agarwood from across southern China as far back as the Song […]

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