Tsang Koon-man (曾貫萬, 1808-1894) – Sam Lee Quarry, Shaukiwan, early 1840s

HF: “Tsang Tai Uk (曾大屋, literally the Big Mansion of the Tsang Family) is also called Shan Ha Wai (山廈圍, literally, Walled Village at the Foothill). Its construction was started in 1847 and completed in 1867. Measuring 45 metres by 137 metres, it was built by Tsang Koon-man (曾貫萬, 1808-1894), nicknamed Tsang Sam-li (曾三利), who was a Hakka (客家) originated […]

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Sam Lee Shop selling quarry stone, Shaukiwan, 1840s

HF: This Antiquities and Monuments Office (AMO) Appraisal mentions that Tsang Koon-man (曾貫萬, 1808-1894), nicknamed Tsang Sam-li (曾三利) came to Hong Kong and “set up his quarry business in Shaukiwan having his shop called Sam Lee Quarry (三利石行)”. Does this mean the quarry was called Sam Lee? The shop [?] was called Sam Lee, and what did it sell? Or both? Or […]

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Harry Long’s WW2 HK experience – Japanese assault and occupation – industrial, transport references

Judy Chan, Harry (Kin Hong) Long’s daughter has kindly sent a number of documents, work testimonials and photographs about her father’s life in Hong Kong. He was born New Zealand in 1900 and died there in 1984. However he worked for two Hong Kong companies, Kung Lee Steam Ship and HK and Yaumati Ferry which is of great interest to us. […]

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Hong Kong Brewers and Distillers – The Sham Tseng Brewery 1930-1935

HF: Martyn Cornell, an enthusiastic writer about, and consumer of beer, wrote an excellent history of brewing in Hong Kong which appeared in the article, Roll out the barrel, SCMP 25th August 2013. Martyn tells me this was a short extract from his much longer Brewery History Society article, A Short History of Beer in Hong Kong, which was published […]

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Koon Fu salt yards – place name Kwun Tong

Additional information in red Hugh Farmer: Various sources mention the origin of the name of the once heavily industrialised Hong Kong area Kwun Tong. In particular it is suggested that the area was named after the Koon Fu salt yards (官富場), set up by the government to secure central administration of the salt trade and prevent unauthorised salt preparation and trading. […]

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Index updated – translators, contributors needed…

Wanted! Can you spare a little of your time? Translators… We now have two people who have offered to translate Chinese, one Japanese translator and one Portuguese (the Macau connection). Would you be able help with the occasional, brief translation. Chinese naturally, Japanese, but also German, French and Italian. Or…? Contributors If you would like to write on a new subject, […]

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Glimpses of Old Hong Kong: Sedan Chairs

Fung Chi Ming: The type of man-powered transport known in English as “sedan chair” has different regional names, including jiao (轎) in China and kago (駕籠) in Japan. In Hong Kong, where it is no longer used as a means of passenger transport, it is known in local Cantonese dialect as san-dau (山兜, “mountain cabin”), kin–yue (肩舆, “shoulder carriage”) and […]

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The China Sugar Refinery Company (previously Wahee, Smith & Co)

HF:  The China Sugar Refinery Company started life, I think, in 1874, as Wahee, Smith & Co (or possibly without a comma). Several partners of Wahee, Smith went bankrupt leading to the sale of the refinery to Jardine, Matheson & Company. Choa Chee-bee was compradore at both companies having come to Hong Kong in the early 1870s from Malacca. If […]

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