Kwong Yee Company, Porcelain Decoration, Peng Chau, founded c1952

HF: “This industry [porcelain decoration] is quite important in Ping Chau, and there are five such factories there. The porcelain comes from Japan, and occasionally from Kiangsi. When the goods arrive, there are no designs on them, and the pieces are unpacked so that designs are painted on them by hand and later taken to the clints to seal them […]

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World War Two -1945 BAAG report on occupied Hong Kong – dockyards

Elizabeth Ride has sent a British Army Aid Group (BAAG) report from 1st March 1945, An Outline of Conditions in Occupied Hong Kong which was compiled in early 1945 for use by the Civil Affairs Committee which was to take on the rehabilitation of HK after the planned allied invasion. HF: The report is lengthy so I am going to divide it […]

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Tsunan Shipyard during the Japanese Occupation, 1942-1945

Elizabeth Ride has sent this brief extract from BAAG Intelligence Summaries written during the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong, World War Two. Among the smaller shipyards, the greatest activity reported in 1944 was at the Tsunan Shipyard in Tokwawan, North of Bailey´s Yard.  Between 40 and 50 small wooden auxiliary vessels were constructed during the year.  The yard also builds […]

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The Shiu Wing Steel Company in Junk Bay

Shiu Wing Steel Limited was briefly mentioned in Newsletter 8 as the only steel rolling mill currently in Hong Kong  and located at Tap Shek Kok, Tuen Mun. Before relocating to its present position  the company was in Junk Bay, present day Tseung Kwan O, from 1958 to 1991. IDJ provides interesting information about the Shiu Wing Steel Company’s time in Junk Bay. […]

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A water powered tilt-hammer incense mill

Further to Dan Waters article “A Joss-stick Mill in Tsuen Wan” published August 26 2013 Here is a photograph of a water powered tilt-hammer used in crushing the production of incense. It is taken from a 1952 book “Hong Kong” by Harold Ingrams published by her Majesty’s Stationary Office, London in 1952. The book contains a chapter on Hong Kong’s […]

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Rat bins – HK Electric/Gas connection and to a colloquial Cantonese “affectionate” term

IDJ sent the English version  of what the piece calls Rat Boxes. Mak Ho Yin has kindly translated it. 「香港電燈公司和煤氣公司與老鼠箱關係密切,因為老鼠箱是掛在電燈柱上的。由於華人極為抗拒(滅鼠人員)進入私人住宅,政府於是鼓勵華人在殺死家中的老鼠後,將鼠屍放在就近的老鼠箱內,由衛生部門職員每日收集清理。老鼠箱掛在電燈柱一景,還衍生了一句香港獨有的俗語「電燈柱掛老鼠箱」,以形容夫妻二人中丈夫瘦削兼且二人身高矮懸殊。」 Ho Yin continues: This paragraph raised my curiosity on the topic of rat bins so apart from translating it I also did a quick check about its history. I have no memory of seeing them hanging at lamp-posts, and I […]

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Wing On Shing Shipyard during the Japanese occupation 1942-1945

Elizabeth Ride: These BAAG reports about Wing On Shing Shipyard come from the period of the Japanese Occupation of Hong Kong during WW2. The Wing On Sing  Shipyard, located on the foreshore along Castlepeak Road  between Shamshuipo and Laichikok is controlled by the Kokoki or Koreki Butai.  It builds and repairs wooden vessels, landing craft, launches and motor boats.  One […]

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Ah King’s Shipyard – location 1925 to 1955?

Stephen Davies has been investigating the location of the A King Shipyard in the Causeway Bay Typhoon shelter – 1925 to 1955. Also known as Ah King’s. Further details about the shipyard can be found at http://gwulo.com/search/node/Ah%20King This includes the three locations of the shipyard: 1st  Date in the record: on the waterfront, The Praya in Wanchai, today’s Johnston Road 2nd 1925 – […]

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The South China Iron Works during World War Two

Elizabeth Ride has sent these British Army Aid Group (BAAG) reports mentioning the South China Iron Works during the Japanese Occupation, WW2. South China Iron Works Ltd., founded in 1938 [incorporated 19th December 1938], lost much of its machinery during the Japanese occupation…but by 1949 had resumed production of diesel engines, including ‘specially designed’ three wheeled vehicles ‘especially designed for […]

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