Industrial Developments in Hong Kong: some personal observations by Dan Waters

Dan Waters: In January 1955, not long after I had arrived in Hong Kong, and when I was a lecturer at the Technical College (since upgraded to the Polytechnic University) in Wood Road, Wanchai, I visited a number of our building students who had been attached for six weeks to building sites. I was accompanied by a Chinese colleague who became […]

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The Association for the Rights of Industrial Accident Victims

Thanks to Mak Ho Yin who has translated the Association’s website About Us- History: “The Association for the Rights of Industrial Accident Victims is a non-profit making organization set up by those suffering from industrial accident injuries and occupation diseases, as well as family members of those deceased killed by industrial accidents. The manufacturing industry in Hong Kong started to […]

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The Hong Kong Heritage Project – Latest Newsletter – Industrial Exhibition and Early Foreign Communities

HF: The Hong Kong Heritage Project’s latest Quarterly Newsletter,  2015/1, contains a wealth of information for those interested in HK’s history and especially its industrial past. As shown below there are also details of  Hulu Culture’s latest exhibition which explores the industrial history of Hung Hom and Mau Tai Wai – including CLP, Whampoa Dockyard and Green Island Cement.| HKHP’s […]

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The Smithfield slaughterhouse, Kennedy Town – photos from 1894

HF: These images come from the Colonial Collection, UK National Archives. Many thanks to Paul Onslow for sending them to me. They are of the slaughter houses and sheep and pig depot shown in this 1889 map of part of Kennedy Town. Related Indhhk articles: The Kennedy Town Slaughterhouses – initial notes

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Hand-dug Caisson excavation in Hong Kong – worst recent construction job? – banned 1995

IDJ: In Hong Kong until around the mid 1990s, curious observers and old men with nothing better to do were a familiar sight gathered at gaps in construction sites fences where amongst the usual activities they could observe a practise possibly unique to Hong Kong. Husband and wife teams constructing large diameter, hand dug piles, known as caissons were common […]

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Japanese Radar Station On Tai Mo Shan

Tymon Mellor: At the end of the Second World War, the returning British forces found a Japanese radar station on the top of Tai Mo Shan. This discovery highlighted the technical strength of the Japanese military. The theory behind radar had been established in the 1920’s with developments in Britain, US, USSR and Japan. However, whereas the British and Americans military […]

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