Proposed world-wide radio-telephonic system for Hong Kong, newspaper article 1938

HF: Thanks to IDJ for sending the following newspaper article in.

I am presuming the system never got started and it would be of interest to learn why not.

The article was a little difficult to read so I have retyped it. Thanks to SCT for proofreading the retyped version.

World Wide Radion System For H.K. HK Telegraph Dec 9 1938 From IDJ

The offer to establish the chain of wireless stations was made by Mr. Edward Wilshaw, Chairman of the Company. It has been accepted by the British Government.

The new scheme for Hongkong, envisages the construction of high-power radio-telegraphic and radio-telephonic transmitting and receiving stations.

With these stations, the Colony will be brought into direct communication with all parts of the world.

It will be possible for the ordinary telephone subscriber in Hongkong to speak by radiophone to 98 per cent. of the 35,000,000 telephone subscribers throughout the world.

The “Telegraph” understands that the scheme with respect to Hongkong is so far advanced that the necessary apparatus is already in London, awaiting shipment to the Colony.

Negotiations are now proceeding between Messrs. Cable and Wireless Ltd. and the Hongkong Government for the purchase of two suitable sites in the Colony – one for the receiving station and the other for the transmitting station.

It is understood that the New Territories was tentatively chosen as the sites when the scheme was originally mooted. No finality has yet been reached, however.

As soon as the new sites are available, the existing radio transmitters in Hongkong – at Cape D’Aguilar and the Peak – will be removed.

SECRECY WITH BEAM RADIO

The new apparatus to be installed when arrangements are finalised is the most modern yet constructed.

The beam system, which ensues comparative secrecy outside the direction in which signals are transmitted and also allows the radiated power to be concentrated – much as light rays are concentrated in a searchlight – will be employed.

This system is already in operation on the chief Empire lines of communication.

The  scheme for the entire Colonial Empire provides for the installation of 32 wireless stations and the eventual employment of 1,000 men, including a large number of highly trained wireless operators.

From the strategic and economic points of view the scheme is of great significance and it is expected to be of substantial benefit to the commerce of the Colonies.

Cheaper Communications 

It is indeed the second step in the process of promoting Imperial development and unity through a consistent policy of cheapening and extending communications the first being the recent introduction of a low flat rate for messages to and from all parts of the Empire.

The equipment of the stations with wireless will also ensure a second line of defence for the Colonies in the event of any interruption of communications as well as a means of keeping in touch with aircraft and ships in the Home waters.

The establishment of the service will also enable a great deal of valuable technical research to be carried out.

Source: Hong Kong Telegraph 12th September 1936.

See:

  1. A Worldwide History of Telecommunications A.A.Huurdeman

This article was first posted on 6th September 2020.

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