World War Two – BAAG reports – Batch 2 – HK industry, factories, mines, CLP…

Elizabeth Ride has sent a further sample of British Army Aid Group reports sent during during the Japanese occupation of HK in WW2. HF: There are many industrial references. Well known companies such as China Light & Power as well as smaller concerns such as those producing oil ,boat diesel engines and acids. Mines reopened by the Japanese. What was […]

» Read more

The Development of Containerization at the Port of Hong Kong

IDJ: In the postwar years mid-stream ship cargo-handling was normal in Hong Kong but the territory was also aware of the great revolution being generated by the world movement towards unitization of cargoes. Godown and shipping companies were routinely recommending to shippers that cargo packages should be less than two-tons in weight (2,032 kilos) and less than forty cubic feet (1,133 […]

» Read more

HK Oxygen – HK Oxygen & Carbide – Far East Oxygen & Acetylene Companies WW2

HF: Elizabeth Ride’s (ER) second comment (ER 2) suggests that there  were three similarly named companies in HK during the Japanese occupation in WW2. I am assuming that the BAAG agents’ reports mentioning ‘factory’ is because these buildings were of primary interest rather the companies themselves. If so we have these: a) The Hong Kong Oxygen Company b) The Hong […]

» Read more

Ship breaking in Hong Kong – Junk Bay 將軍澳 – late 1970s

IDJ: These shipbreaking images were taken in the Junk Bay (Tseung Kwan O 將軍澳) area around the late 1970s or early 1980s. Junk Bay like Gin Drinkers Bay seemed to change by the month during this period with continuous reclamations so it’s very difficult to recognise some places over time. Especially when hills and mountains are flattened. In the second image of […]

» Read more

UDL Argos Engineering & Heavy Industries

HF:  In the article Ship breaking in Hong Kong – Junk Bay 將軍澳 – late 1970s IDJ mentions Argos which was a contract labour supplier to China Light & Power for a long period and ran their own fleet of double-decker buses to get their people to the Castle Peak Power Station site when it was under construction. From the company website: […]

» Read more

Kwik Djoen Eng, 郭春映, North Point shipping reclamation, 1920s

Hugh Farmer: Kwik Djoen Eng was apparently also known as Chun Yang, the shortened form of Guo Chun Yang, and somewhat confusingly, for non-Chinese readers, Kwok Chun Yeung. Many thanks to Thomas Ngan for confirming that Kwik Djoen Eng and Kwok Chun Yeung are the same person. Thomas suggests this array of names is likely due to the romanisation of the same Chinese […]

» Read more

Brick Glass Cones UK – connection to Kennedy Town glass manufacturer

HF: The Indhhk article  The Hong Kong and Macao Glass Manufacturing Company Ltd in Kennedy Town contains an extract found by moddsey from the Hong Kong Daily Press of 9th Jan 1886. This mentions the Glassworks appearance including: “The western side is bounded by the glasshouse proper, a square building, from the centre of the roof of which is seen […]

» Read more

“Worst industrial jobs in UK’s history” – Hong Kong’s own list?

HF: You may not have come across this UK Channel 4 five part series narrated by Tony Robinson. Jobs featured are: bridge-builder, canal tunnel legger, soap boiler, glass blower, knocker up, bone cleaner, presser, saggar maker’s bottom knocker and child mine hurrier… I wonder what  Hong Kong’s  “worst” occupations were (are)…hand- dug caisson excavator, lead mining, textile dyeing, ship-breaking, oyster […]

» Read more

World War Two – BAAG reports – Batch 1 – HK industrial companies, trading syndicates…

Elizabeth Ride has sent a sample of BAAG reports from 1942 to 1944. These cover mainly commodity prices and supply in Hong Kong during this period plus snippets about currency, utilities, transport, trade syndicates and the Canton Army Commissariat which operated factories in Canton producing for the Japanese army. File 11  mentions four HK companies. HF: I have given each […]

» Read more
1 132 133 134 135 136 146