Preece, Cardew and Rider – Consulting Engineers for Hok Un power station

Preece, Cardew and Rider were the consulting engineers for a proposed extension of Hok Un power station, Hung Hom in the 1930s. “In 1934 a committee consisting of directors and senior staff was formed to deal with the extensions proposed. It met regularly for the next several years and made many important decisions based quite often on the advice of […]

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Phonographs, Gramophones and Record Companies in Hong Kong

Can anyone provide further information about these aspects of the music industry in Hong Kong? Chunny Bhamra: Gramophones and Phonographs were never really made in HK but were assembled here with metal parts being imported from Europe and wooden cabinets usually made in India and Malaysia. Cabinets were made especially for the “Tropical” countries using Teak as it was the one […]

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Green Island lighthouse – extract from RASHKB journal article

HF: Louis Ha and and the late Dan Waters kindly gave permission to post their article, HK lighthouses + men who manned them, on our website. This was originally published in the RASHKB Journal, Volume 41, 2001 linked below. The following is an extract from the article: Green Island Lighthouse started to operate on 1st July 1875, about three months after […]

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Thomas De La Rue and Co, UK – Hong Kong banknote manufacturer, 1984-1996

De La Rue plc is a banknote manufacturer, security printing, and papermaking company with headquarters in Basingstoke Hampshire, England. It currently also has a factory on the Team Valley Trading Estate, Gateshead, and other facilities at Loughton, Essex and Bathford, Somerset all also in England. From 1984 to 1996 Thomas De La Rue plc operated a HK banknote printing plant in […]

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The Rise and Fall of Letterpress printing in Hong Kong

HF: Letterpress printing is a technique of relief printing using a printing press, a process by which many copies are produced by repeated direct impression of an inked, raised surface against sheets or a continuous roll of paper. A worker composes and locks movable type into the “bed” or “chase” of a press, inks it, and presses paper against it […]

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Hong Kong Steam Laundry Companies from 1864 to the early 1930s – a history of insurmountable vicissitudes

James Chan: Our article, The [Hong Kong] Steam Laundry Company, asks for further information about what was thought to have been two steam laundry companies over a considerable period of time from the late 19th century to the early 1950s. Two pieces on the subject of steam laundries were included in a series of articles in the South China Morning […]

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Newspaper hawkers- the decline in number, licences no longer being issued

HF:  “Newspaper hawker licences are no longer being issued, the government confirmed Wednesday. Amid the impending demise of dai pai dong – the practice of selling cheap food in open-air stalls – Secretary for Food and Health Dr Ko Wing-man said the government had not issued newspaper hawker licences “under normal circumstances” since 2000 and had no plans to issue […]

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Kwok Tak Seng – Hung Cheong / YKK Zippers, Eternal Enterprises, and Sun Hung Kai Properties

York Lo wrote a short biography of Kwok Tak-seng included in Dictionary of Hong Kong Biography. Kwok is probably best known as one of the founders and chairman of Sun Hung Kai Enterprises which became Sun Hung Kai Properties. However before this he was involved in Hung Cheong Import & Export Ltd which was the HK agent for YKK Zippers, […]

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The film The Sand Pebbles – replica of the USS San Pablo built at Vaughan & Yung Engineering Co Ltd

York Lo’s recent article, J.H. Vaughan – An American Shipbuilder in Hong Kong, mentions that the yard built the replica of the USS San Pablo for the well known film The Sand Pebbles. The article has prompted IDJ to send the following: The Sand Pebbles – Production Notes THE BACKGROUND When the late Richard McKenna’s first and only novel, “The Sand Pebbles,” […]

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The rise and fall of the Hong Kong tailoring industry – five hundred TST tailors in the 1960s

HF: It’s hard to walk along Nathan Road in Tsim Sha Tsui these days without being accosted by someone offering the ubiquitous copy watches or gentlemen’s tailor sir. There may be several of the latter dotted around TST, Wanchai and Central but as Stuart Heaver recently wrote in an article for the SCMP the number of tailors in Hong Kong has suffered […]

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