The Port of Hong Kong – Marine Dept 1966 – ship building, ship breaking

Mike T and Hugh Farmer: The Port of Hong Kong was published by the Marine Department in 1966. The report covers a great deal to do with the administration of the port at this time. Of particular interest:- The section on Ship Breaking contains a list of firms engaged in this industry in the mid-1960s. Dockyards, Drydocks, Shipbuilding and Repair […]

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Kai Tak airport – BAAG Reports 1942-1944, plus other HK landing strips

Elizabeth Ride: The following reports concern Kai Tak aerodrome in BAAG Intelligence Summaries. I do not guarantee that I have been able to find every single mention, and I advise anyone interested to have a look at the collected Intelligence reports in the Hong Kong Heritage Project (see below).  I have added some bombing reports to this article. I would […]

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Socony-Vacuum Oil Company in HK from 1896

HF and Elizabeth Ride (ER) New information in red. The article 1941 Report – Future Control and Development of the Port Of Hong Kong mentions the Socony-Vacuum Oil Company. The first Hong Kong mention I can find is about the Vacuum Oil Company  from The Hongkong Government Gazette of 23rd May 1896. Then this from the Hongkong Government Gazette of […]

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The Hong Kong Aircraft Engineering Company Ltd – Flight magazine 1952

IDJ: This article comes from Flight magazine 8th Feb 1952 Hugh Farmer: The article states that HAEC was formed by the “pooling of British shipping and air interests”. The HAECO group website says that the company was established in 1950 following a merger between Swire’s Pacific Air Maintenance Services (established in 1947) and Jardine Air Maintenance Company. I wonder what […]

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The Development of Containerization at the Port of Hong Kong

IDJ: In the postwar years mid-stream ship cargo-handling was normal in Hong Kong but the territory was also aware of the great revolution being generated by the world movement towards unitization of cargoes. Godown and shipping companies were routinely recommending to shippers that cargo packages should be less than two-tons in weight (2,032 kilos) and less than forty cubic feet (1,133 […]

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UDL Argos Engineering & Heavy Industries

HF:  In the article Ship breaking in Hong Kong – Junk Bay 將軍澳 – late 1970s IDJ mentions Argos which was a contract labour supplier to China Light & Power for a long period and ran their own fleet of double-decker buses to get their people to the Castle Peak Power Station site when it was under construction. From the company website: […]

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