Rope-making and Dyeing/Calendering on Ap Lei Chau Island. 1971 RASHKB article

James Chan:  I found this Royal Asiatic Society (HK Branch) ‘Notes and Queries’ article while looking through old volumes of the HKBRAS’ Journals. I thought it would be a useful addition to what we have on rope-making in Hong Kong. I regret that I was unable to find the illustrations that accompanied the article. If you can please contact the […]

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Chan Chi Kee Cutlery, in business since the 1920s, Shanghai Street

Chan Chi Cutlery Image Courtesy SCMP

Chan Chi Kee Cutlery has been business since the 1920s, currently at 316-318 Shanghai Street, specializing in hand-pounded woks and its famous cutlery. ‘Alongside Wo Shing Goldsmith are a few other long-term shopkeepers, who have seen the rise and fall of Hong Kong’s manufacturing industry – selling kitchen tools, especially stainless steel products. Chan Chi Kee Cutlery, for example, has […]

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The Hong Kong Rattan Industry and some of its key historical players

Rattan Industry Image 20 York Lo

York Lo: The Hong Kong Rattan Industry and some of its key historical players Rattan is one of the oldest industries in Hong Kong and astute merchants and skilled craftsmen in southern China had long profited from importing rattan cane from Southeast Asia (the majority from Indonesia with the remainder from Malaysia, Burma and the Philippines), weaving them into beautiful […]

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Leung Kit Lam’s steelware store, Shanghai Street

Leung Kit Lam Detail Photo Of Shanghai Street SCMP

‘Leung Kit-lam’s eponymous steelware store is…probably the last of its kind in Hong Kong. For decades, he has operated the business alone. Tucked away in an alley, with a barely visible storefront, Leung works seven days a week making strainers, rat traps and crab pots. “Some neighbouring hotels have bought a few of my rat traps,” he says. The years […]

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The last minibus sign writer in Hong Kong, Mak Kam-sang

Bus Mini, Last Sign Writer Mak Mak Sang Snipped Detail You Tube Film JPG

‘At his shop in Yau Ma Tei, Mak Kam-sang’s walls are covered in calligraphy signs he has written. Passers-by stop and peer into the store, curious about what it sells as it is so different from everything else in the area  Mak is the last calligrapher in Hong Kong behind the red and blue signs informing would-be passengers where a […]

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Lee Wo Steelyard – Shanghai Street – probably last of its kind in Hong Kong

Lee Wo Steelyard, Image From Connie Fong, The Young Reporters Magazine 11.12.16

Connie Fong: “People in Hong Kong may come across traditional Chinese steelyards, a type of balance, in wet markets and Chinese medicine pharmacies. Yet only a few of them know the proper way to use one, though it was the optimal tool for measuring weight in the olden days. HF: I have tried to leave a comment at the end […]

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Wo Shing Goldsmith – on Shanghai Street since 1892

Wo Shing Goldsmith Co Owners Cheung Chuen Hoi (left) And His Brother Chueng Wai Nam SCMP 10.3.17

‘Goldsmiths and jewellery makers flourished on Shanghai Street in the 1970s and ’80s, given their proximity to the Yau Ma Tei typhoon shelter and their target customers – the boat-dwelling Tanka people, who put on performances and sold food to locals and tourists. Wo Shing Goldsmith has been located on the street since 1892 and celebrates its 125th anniversary this […]

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Hong Kong’s Preserved Ginger Industry – Dan Waters discovers and recollects

Dan Waters writes: My first recollection of the name, ‘Hong Kong’, was as a teenager in the early 1930s. My uncle was a warrant officer in the British army and, for a time, he was stationed in India. Every Christmas a large, colourful blue-and-white porcelain jar of preserved ginger would arrive at our home in Norfolk, England. This had been […]

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