The Royal Naval Dockyard Hong Kong during World War Two

Elizabeth Ride:  A selection of information reported in the BAAG Intelligence Summaries.    1. Layout.  September, 1944.  [From indistinct original] During the Battle of Hongkong, December 1941. *   At the outbreak of war, HMS Moth was in drydock with some plates off.  The guns were removed and the ship was scuttled by flooding the dock.  The dock gate was […]

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Operation “Mateys” – Dock workers extraction from HK during the Japanese occupation WW2

Elizabeth Ride: Here is a transcription of an audio letter from my father, Sir Lindsay Ride, which concerns the Dockyard workers’ extraction from HK during the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong, World War Two. For further details about this please see the article, WW2 – BAAG, Mateys and Allied attempts to disrupt HK Dockyards, linked below. “Operation “Mateys” was one of the […]

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19th Century Wanchai Shipyards – Messrs. George Fenwick & Co Ltd

Stephen Davies has researched the many small shipyards which existed along the Wanchai waterfront from shortly after the colony of Hong Kong came into being up until the early years of the 20th century. These shipyards had a tough time during this period especially during HK’s first 20 years. Businesses came and went because of fluctuating demand thanks to some […]

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Dutch Companies in China 1903-1941

Nicholas Kitto has sent in a PDF file of the book: Corporate Behaviour and Political Risk: Dutch Companies in China 1903-1941 by  Frans-Paul van der Putten. This was freely downloadable from the Leiden University website. Unfortunately the images are absent. HF: The book covers in some detail a variety of Dutch concerns in China. Namely:- Chapter 2 Banking: Nederlandsche Handel-Maatschappij (NHM) […]

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On the slow boat – Sai Wan Ho, Kwun Tong, Sam Ka Tsuen ferries – part three…

Hugh Farmer:  On the 25th September 2014 I took the ferry from Sai Wan Ho to Kwun Tong, walked from there passing through the industrial area  of Yau Tong and caught the ferry back to Sai Wan Ho from Sam Ka Tsuen ferry pier. I took pictures of the piers, ferries, crew and passengers…of the slow boats… a tribute to […]

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Andrew Weir Shipping and Trading Co.Ltd (Bank Line) – connection to Sha Lo Wan Mine, Lantau

HF: Tymon Mellor’s article, Sha Lo Wan Mine, includes, “A local company, The Bank Line (China) Ltd was interested in production of the ore for shipment to Japan, through Andrew Weir & Co, a local “reputable firm” as advised by the superintendent of Mines in a memo dated 7th January, 1953.” Here is an introduction to this British shipping company […]

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Alfred Holt, 1829-1911, founder of Alfred Holt & Co (Holts Wharf TST)

HF: Holt’s Wharf and the Godown were set up in 1910 and jointly owned by the Swire Group and Blue Funnel Line. Together they formed  a railway and freight hub in Tsim Sha Tsui. See the article, Holts’s Wharf and Godown, linked below. Here is Alfred Holt’s obituary posted on the excellent Grace’s Guides website and originally published by The Institution […]

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Kwong Tat Loong Shipyard (Brothers) Ltd – Tsing Yi – a HK industry in decline

HF: Tam Kon Shan Road runs for a couple of kilometres along  the north coast of Tsing Yi island. The western kilometre is home to about twenty shipyards – the largest number of this industry, I believe, remaining in Hong Kong. Repairing and maintenance not shipbuilding. On 13th December 2014 I visited Kwong Tat Loong Shipyard (Brothers) Ltd. and took […]

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Chen Din Hwa – founder of Nan Fung Textiles 1954 and “King of Cotton Yarn”

James Chan: Chen Din Hwa was born in Ningbo, China in 1923. His family were poor and he left school when he was 12 and became an apprentice to a silk merchant. When he was 22 he was already chief manager of his family business and owned several shops in Shanghai and Ningbo. In 1949, Chen’s family moved to Hong […]

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45th Anniversary of first scheduled shipping container service HK-USA , Vietnam war connection

HF: On the evening of 3oth July 1969 the vessel San Juan arrived at Ocean Terminal. It departed 15 hours later having loaded 150 containers. This marked the first scheduled container service between Hong Kong and the US. The San Juan was operated by Sea-Land and the new container  service was a by-product of the company’s contract with the US […]

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