Sugar Street 糖街, Causeway Bay – origins of the name – silver into sugar or vice versa!

HF: In his book, The Atlas: Archaeology of an Imaginary City, a mixture of fact and fiction about Hong Kong in the past and future, Dung Kai Cheung, Louis, writes about Sugar Street (糖街) in Causeway Bay. Dung recounts the local legend that the Hong Kong Mint, based there from 1866 to 1868, failed because, in spite of melted silver being […]

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Mui Wo salt pans, Lantau Island

In our Queries and Answers 5 Eric Spain had an enquiry about salt production in Mui Wo. He remembers seeing some RAF aerial photographs which showed salt pans there. [presumably immediately before, during or shortly after WW2?]. Frank Watson and Namussi added information to Q+A 5 which is linked below. HF: Further information can be found in a post I made on gwulo.com […]

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Cheung Sha Wan Abattoir, 1969-1999

HF: Cheung Sha Wan Abattoir was one of HK’s three main slaughter houses before they were all closed and Sheung Shui opened. Established in 1969, it closed in October 1999. It’s a very large building, which I have been unable to enter, and is connected to the adjacent vegetable market via a footbridge. The Government’s decided in 1995 to close the three main […]

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Amoy Canning – connection to WW2 POWs and a particular Englishman?

HF: As part of my research into the Amoy Canning Company I came across the account given below. I don’t know what the Hong Kong POWs were fed but good quality canned food seems unlikely… Did the Japanese feed POWs with Amoy “beaned pork” ? Who was this unnamed Englishman? How did the latter procure the soybeans and tin plate[s] […]

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Taikoo Sugar Refinery – Bullivant’s Ropeway for transporting coal from ship to shore

New information in red. Robin Selby has sent an account from 1891 of an aerial ropeway, or actually three, used to transport coal from pier head to coal store in Hong Kong. HF: Though not mentioned by name I am presuming the company concerned is the Taikoo Sugar Refinery which was established by Swire in 1881 and went into production in […]

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Beer in Hong Kong – Part Four – The Hong Kong Brewers and Distillers Ltd 1930-1935

Martyn Cornell has kindly given permission for extracts from his article, A Short History of Beer in Hong Kong, to be posted on our website. The article was published in the Journal of the Brewery History Society, Brewery History, Issue 156, 2012 Martyn has his own blog, Zythophile – Beer now and then, linked below. Despite its title the article is […]

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Yuen Kut Lam – producer of Kam Wo tea – vanishing HK trades

Mary Anne Le Bas has sent an SCMP article, Six home-grown Hong Kong trades at risk of dying out, published on 21st June 2015. The fifth of these is a product that has been around for around 200 years. The company was founded by current manager Yuen Yee Lum’s great-great-grandfather in Guangzhou, in 1835. Mr Yuen believes his is the last company making […]

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Salt Manufacture in Hong Kong 1940s – 1967 RASHKB article

HF: Producing salt from the sea is one of the oldest industries in Hong Kong. I have information, however slight, that it was produced in at least these locations. Kwun Tong Mui Wo (Lantau) San Hui (Tuen Mun) Tai O ( Lantau) Yim Lin Ha (Sha Tau Kok – NE NT) Yim Tin Tsai (Sai Kung) Wong Ka Wai (Tuen […]

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The five Tang brothers – oyster farming Deep Bay, Sui Luen Weaving Mill 瑞麟 織造廠, Sui Luen Towel Mill 瑞麟毛巾 廠, Tung On Cheong Bakery 同安祥餅家 – further information provided by a granddaughter

HF: Jennie Tang, the granddaughter of one of the five Tang brothers, left a comment about the original Historical Building Appraisal article shown below. It should be noted that Jennie doubts the existence of the third brother mentioned in the Appraisal. When I contacted her she kindly sent further information, and the two photos shown here, especially about her grandfather, […]

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Hong Kong Industry during World War Two

HF: This is an article where we can gradually add information about what happened to HK’s industry, manufacturing, mining , transport and other related areas during World War 2. As bits and pieces come in I’ll update the article and re-post it with the current date. Contributors: PC Philip Cracknell HF Hugh Farmer IDJ FCM Fung Chi Ming CM Craig […]

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