Water supply for boats, Lai Chi Kok, early 20th century

Tymon Mellor: As a key trading port for Southern China, Hong Kong harbour has always been full of boats stocking up for the next long journey. One question has always puzzled me, where did they get their fresh water? A look at the original maps of Kowloon provides an answer. The first map of Kowloon and the New Territories was […]

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Kau Wa Keng Old Village, 九華徑 – glove and shoe factories – closed in the late 1970s

Angela Chan recently posted a comment on our article, Kau Wa Keng Old Village, 九華徑 – recent photographs, which says that there were indeed small factories, namely making gloves and shoes, in the village as suggested in the article. Angela has kindly expanded on her initial comment with the following information and images: We had relatives and friends working at the glove […]

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Sugar Street 糖街, Causeway Bay – origins of the name – silver into sugar or vice versa!

HF: In his book, The Atlas: Archaeology of an Imaginary City, a mixture of fact and fiction about Hong Kong in the past and future, Dung Kai Cheung, Louis, writes about Sugar Street (糖街) in Causeway Bay. Dung recounts the local legend that the Hong Kong Mint, based there from 1866 to 1868, failed because, in spite of melted silver being […]

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The demise of Yen Chow Street Hawker Bazaar, Sham Shui Po

HF: “The bazaar was set up in the 1970s when the government moved hawkers off nearby streets to its site opposite Sham Shui Po Police Station. More than 100 textile vendors once crammed into the site, which resembles a small squatter village with its patchwork roof of corrugated metal, plastic sheets and tarpaulins. Although they are set out along a […]

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Kowloon – Canton Railway (British Section) – Kowloon Station Relocation

Tymon Mellor: With the end of the Second World War and the growing population of Hong Kong, it was clear that upgrading of the Kowloon – Canton Railway line would be required to accommodate the increase in passenger and freight traffic. The first priority was to provide a new terminus within Kowloon to accommodate the passenger and freight services. Following […]

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Hong Kong’s maritime street names – colonial bias against Chinese involvement?

Stephen Davies recently wrote an article for the SCMP about maritime street names in Hong Kong. He noted, “considering Hong Kong is one of the world’s great ports, street names with maritime connections are remarkably few – no more than 10 per cent of the total. But that is enough, when loaded into a database and tested for patterns, to add […]

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Mui Wo salt pans, Lantau Island

In our Queries and Answers 5 Eric Spain had an enquiry about salt production in Mui Wo. He remembers seeing some RAF aerial photographs which showed salt pans there. [presumably immediately before, during or shortly after WW2?]. Frank Watson and Namussi added information to Q+A 5 which is linked below. HF: Further information can be found in a post I made on gwulo.com […]

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Kwong Shan Tsuen Mine – Castle Peak

HF: Our Q+A 26 Tsing Shan Mine (Castle Peak area)? – Japanese occupation, WW2, linked below, asks about a possible mine or mines in the Castle Peak (青山) area as a British Army Aid Group (BAAG) report of 1944 mentions a “rumour” of a mine there. Tsing Shan is the name of the well-known monastery located at the eastern foot of the […]

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Lighthouses in Hong Kong pre-1941- revised

Stephen Davies: These are the eleven lighthouses (excluding beacons and buoys) that the records show were operated by the Harbour Master before 1941. Note: The locations of Ma Wan (Kap Shui Mun) and Tungkwu/Lung Kwu Chau lighthouses are not yet shown on the map. Gap Rock lighthouse was in Chinese waters but under the aegis of, and paid for by, […]

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The locations of Lime Kilns in Hong Kong – a list

HF: Here is a list of all the Lime Kilns (or Lime Kiln “Factories) in Hong Kong I have come across. I have linked Indhhk articles about specific locations. 1. Chek Lap Kok Island, Fu Tei Wan Lime Kiln, moved to Tung Chung, Lantau Island. Fu Tei Wan Lime Kiln 2. Cheung Chau Island Tai Kwai Wan 3. Lamma Island Lo So […]

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