World War Two -1945 BAAG report on Dockyards in occupied Hong Kong

Hugh Farmer: Elizabeth Ride has sent a British Army Aid Group (BAAG) report from 1st March 1945, An Outline of Conditions in Occupied Hong Kong.  One of the BAAG’s aims during WW2 was to gather military intelligence in Japanese occupied Hong Kong which included a great deal of what can loosely be called industrial information. Thus this report covers many […]

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William Seybourne Bailey co-founder of Bailey’s Shipyard

Hugh Farmer with thanks to IDJ: Some initial notes on WS Bailey founder with EO Murphy of WS Bailey & Co, Bailey’s Shipyard. Thanks to Robyn Evans, WS Bailey’s granddaughter for birth and death details. Robyn adds the information on his gravestone is incorrect. born Dublin 15th April 1859 died War Memorial Hospital Hong Kong 27th December 1935 Extracts from Twentieth Century […]

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The Incense Tree in Hong Kong – a vanishing species

Hugh Farmer: For over two thousand years the Chinese have used incense in religious ceremonies, to venerate ancestors, in traditional medicine and in daily life. The two  most important ingredients in Chinese incense are agarwood and sandalwood. In what was to become colonial Hong Kong local producers brought in agarwood from across southern China as far back as the Song […]

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The KCR – choices of routes, construction and opening

Hugh Farmer with thanks to IDJ for the main account: The idea of connecting Hong Kong and China with a railway was first proposed to prominent Hong Kong businessmen in March 1864 by a British railway engineer, Sir Rowland MacDonald Stephenson (1808-1895), who had considerable experience of developing railways in India. The minutes of the committee of the Chamber of […]

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Stone breaking in early 20th Century Hong Kong

Hugh Farmer with thanks to IDJ for the source of information. “Stonebreakers in the early twentieth century. Granite in Hong Kong is of high quality and abundant. As a common construction material for columns, door frames and floors, the demand for granite was large. Because of its weight granite was transported by stone-boat by water from the quarry to the […]

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