Gordon Burnett Gifford Hull – Needle Hill Mine, Shing Mun Reservoir

The article Needle Hill Tungsten Mine, published in Newsletter 7, states that the deposits were discovered by G.B. Gifford Hull in 1935 while working on the construction of the Jubilee Reservoir (now Shing Mun). Dan Waters would like to add, “in 1956 Resident Engineer Gordon Gifford Hull kindly invited us lecturers at the old Technical College (now ugraded to Poly […]

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Sang Sang Mining Company – connection to Needle Hill Tungsten Mine, 1935?

Hugh Farmer: The article, Needle Hill Tungsten Mine, says that, “The deposit was discovered in 1935 by a civil engineer, Mr G Hull, who was working on the construction of the Jubilee Reservoir (now known as Shing Mun)…Hull obtained a mining licence in the same year but the lease was subsequently transferred to Marsman Hong Kong China Ltd.  Marsman undertook prospecting […]

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Rubber Footware – 1952, 60 factories, 8,000 workers

HF: The manufacturing of rubber products was one of Hong Kong’s six leading industries in the late 1950s. And part of that industry was the production of rubber footware. Even in the early 1950s there were over 60 factories producing such items employing over 8,000 people. This initial article brings together a few items we have gathered about the industry in […]

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The Hong Kong Electric Company – 1889 to the decommissioning of Ap Lei Chau Power station in 1989

HF: The following information comes from a variety of sources. IDJ has kindly sent several of the images. Following a meeting of the Executive Council to discuss land reclamation, Bendyshe Layton a British businessman and member of the Legislative Council, suggested to Sir Catchick Paul Chater that Hong Kong acquire an electricity generator. Chater, who was to remain a director of the new Hong […]

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Amoy Canning – a brief history since 1908

“C” says: The Chinese name of the company has always been 淘化大同, not 淘化大隆. Nowadays it is often abbreviated as 淘大. Hugh Farmer: The origins of this well known Hong Kong company are somewhat confusing, at least for someone unable to read Chinese, in that they involve a variety of English translations and merges between these companies. I have tried to […]

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Hong Kong Knitters – founded 1955

HF, IDJ and Mike T: The company was founded on 15th July 1955. This advert from 1963, sent by IDJ outlines China Engineers Ltd’s interests including Hong Kong Knitters which at that time was manufacturing, ‘Easeley’ cotton and woollen knitted shirts, combed cotton underwear. In June 1990, Hong Kong Knitters Ltd. was acquired by Yangtzekiang Garment Ltd (YGM) through an associated […]

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The Hong Kong Printing Press – Pedro D’Alcantara Xavier (1886-1952)

New Information HF: The Hong Kong Printing Press seems to have operated from 1888 to 1980 according to the website linked below dedicated to the company. The site appears to have been researched by descendants of family members who were involved in the company for several generations. I would like to hear from anyone contributing to the website linked below. […]

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South China Iron Works – violent communist/nationalist clashes 1956

Mike T: According to “The Fall of Hong Kong: Britain, China and the Japanese Occupation” by Philip Snow, South China Iron Works was owned by the Chinese Nationalist government (ie. Sun Yat-sen’s anti-communist Kuomintang) as of the 1940s. [This information provided by Mike was originally a comment he made below our article, The South China Iron Works – post WW2 producer of […]

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