Early HK Chinese manufacturers 1870s + around WW1

Hugh Farmer: These two extracts provide a clear indication of the range of manufacturing and products produced by Chinese in Hong Kong at two periods. It would be of interest to hear a little about some of these goods. “While the expatriate investors set up all the major industrial enterprises , the Chinese community also went beyond handicraft industries and […]

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West Brother Island (Tai Mo To) Graphite Mine

Hugh Farmer: The mine was in the bottom left hand (SW) corner of the island (apologies for a fuzzy picture that resembles shark’s fin soup) West Brother Island lies to the north east of HK International Airport.  I have read an account that the graphite was discovered in the early 1950s  by fishermen who were looking for sandstone to make […]

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HK Textile Industry Photos and Information 1953, 1958 + 1961

IDJ has sent in these pages from HK Government Yearbooks. Can anyone tell us exactly which companies are shown and where these factories/mills were? Click on the images to enlarge. This article was first posted on 31st January 2014. See: The Hongkong Cotton-Spinning, Weaving and Dyeing Company Ltd 1898-1914  Shanghai Spinners: Pioneers of Hong Kong’s industrialization, 1947-1955 About Nanyang Cotton […]

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Textile industrial terms used in Hong Kong Cotton-Spinning…Co 1898-1914

Hugh Farmer: The article The Hongkong Cotton-Spinning, Weaving and Dyeing Company Ltd 1898-1914 contained a number of terms with which I and possibly others are unfamiliar. I thought it might be useful to explain what these words or phrases mean and to briefly mention the aim of any process involved rather than detailed construction of any machine mentioned. The latter […]

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CLP’s Hok Un Power Station – immediately post World War Two

IDJ: When Hong Kong was liberated after the surrender of the Japanese, one of the first groups to arrive was “Shield Force.”  This mainly comprised 3,000 Royal Air Force personnel who had been diverted from their expected task of building Pacific island aerodromes to assist the Allied advance towards Japan. Not all RAF personnel in the war were involved in flying […]

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Lam Tei Quarry – Ping Shan Airport , RAF Technical Magazine Report, May 1946

IDJ has sent in more information about the Lam Tei Quarry and its connection to the proposed Ping Shan Airport. This time a Technical Bulletin from the Airfield Construction Service (RAF) from May 1946.   See: Ping Shan – proposed airport for Hong Kong Ping Shan airfield – further information Ping Shan airport – an extract from Paul Tsui’s unpublished […]

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Lam Tei Quarry connections with post WW2 proposed Ping Shan Airport

IDJ : Quarries supplying construction materials for the proposed Ping Shan Airport are thought to be at the location above, the nearest mapped quarries to the site. They were connected to the airport site by a temporary narrow gauge railway. Site drawings for this project have not been found so far.  The RAF’s Airfield Construction Branch paper mentions the clearing […]

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Yau Ma Tei – origin of place name from rope making?

Lawrence Tsui suggests that the place name Yau Ma Tei originated through the industry there of making marine ropes – literally, ‘Place for the Oily Flex [Flax?] Ropes’. Hugh Farmer adds: Gwulo had a forum about the origin of the name Yau Ma Tei  in 2006 to which several people contributed quoting a variety of sources. I have included the […]

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